University of Wisconsin–Madison

Sample Slavic Grad Courses

The following sample schedules are provided to show the potential sequence of coursework undertaken toward the MA and PhD in the Russian Literature and Culture track. Course sequence and funding sources are illustrative only, and may differ from actual offering. These schedules assume that the student is admitted with no deficiencies in Russian language.

Year I, Fall Semester:

[Assumed method of funding: Fellowship]

  • Foundation Course: Realism (3 cr.)
  • Methods of Teaching Slavic Languages (2 cr.)
  • Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Studies (1 cr.)
  • Intensive Polish/Czech/Bosnian-Serbian-Croatian (3 cr.)
  • Seminar (3 cr.)

Year I, Spring Semester:

[Assumed method of funding: Fellowship]

  • Foundation Course: Modernism (3 cr.)
  • Introduction to Literary Theory (2 cr.)
  • Intensive Polish/Czech/Bosnian-Serbian-Croatian (3 cr.)
  • Seminar (2 cr.)

 

Year II, Fall Semester:

[Assumed method of funding: Teaching Assistantship]

  • Foundation Course: Soviet, “un”-Soviet, and Post-Soviet Literature (3 cr.)
  • Structure of Russian (2 cr.)
  • PhD Minor Course (3 cr.)

Year II, Spring Semester:

[Assumed method of funding: Teaching Assistantship]

  • Foundation Course: Old Russian Literature (2 cr.)
  • Introduction to Old Church Slavonic and the History of the Russian Literary Language (2 cr.)
  • PhD Minor Course (3 cr.)

Requirements for the MA must be fulfilled by the end of the fourth semester in residence, and students must successfully complete the Gateway exercise in order to proceed with study toward the PhD.

 

Year III, Fall Semester:

[Assumed method of funding: Teaching Assistantship]

  • Foundation Course: Eighteenth-century Russian Literature (3 cr.)
  • Seminar (2 cr.)
  • PhD Minor Course (3 cr.)

Year III, Spring Semester:

[Assumed method of funding: Teaching Assistantship]

  • Foundation Course: Romanticism (3 cr.)
  • Seminar (3 cr.)
  • Apprenticeship in Teaching (1 cr.)

 

Year IV, Fall Semester:

[Assumed method of funding: Project Assistantship]

  • Independent Study (6 cr.)
  • Apprenticeship in Writing (1 cr.)

Capstone Portfolio is submitted to the Department preliminary examination committee at the beginning of the seventh semester in residence. The student then works to craft a dissertation proposal, and submits and defends the proposal to the prelim committee by the end of the semester.

Following the successful defense of the dissertation proposal and the meeting of all other requirements, students advance to dissertator status and begin work on the dissertation. Funding during the dissertator period is generally a mixture of fellowships, teaching assistantships, and project assistantships, depending on availability and the individual student. Defense of the dissertation is expected to take place during the sixth year of graduate study, and no later than the end of the seventh year.