University of Wisconsin–Madison

Courses

German, Scandinavian Studies, and Slavic Languages Courses

The Department of German, Nordic, and Slavic offers a range of courses. We teach more than a dozens languages, including Czech, Danish, Dutch, Finnish, German, Icelandic, Kazakh, Norwegian, Old Norse, Polish, Russian, Sami, Serbo-Croatian, Swedish, Turkish, and Yiddish. Our courses explore cultures and literature from across the globe, from Iceland to Germany to Russia to Turkey. Study with GNS and see the world.

Questions regarding Undergraduate Courses can be directed to Bridget Sutton.

Questions regarding Graduate Courses can be directed to Mark Mears.

For course descriptions from current and previous semesters, please see our archive.

Undergraduates (left to right) Whitney Bauer, Molly DeLong, and Joanna Krystek study in the Memorial Library at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on April 26, 2007. DeLong is using the campus’s wireless network to connect her laptop computer to the Internet.
©UW-Madison University Communications 608/262-0067
Photo by: Jeff Miller
Date: 04/07 File#: D200 digital camera frame 5694

 

 

Fall 2018 GNS Courses

For the most up-to-date listings of courses offered by German, Nordic, and Slavic please see the Course Guide under the subject headings GERMAN, SCAND ST, SLAVIC, and LITTRANS (Literature in Translation), and for Turkish and Kazakh courses see LCA LANG listings.

In the fall, GNS will offer introductory (first semester) courses in the following languages: Czech, Danish, Finnish, German, Modern Icelandic, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish, and Turkish. We will offer intermediate and advanced courses in these and other languages, including Polish and Serbo-Croatian.

German, Nordic, and Slavic Course Descriptions for Fall 2018:

German course descriptions

Scandinavian Studies course descriptions

Slavic course descriptions

Descriptions for GNS courses taught in Literature in Translation and LCA Language

Please contact our Undergraduate Coordinator (sutten4@wisc.edu) for more information.

For course descriptions from current and previous semesters, please see our archive.

Summer 2018 GNS Courses

GNS offers a range of exciting courses this summer, offered both online and on campus. See descriptions below.

GERMAN 101/401 – First Semester German

GERMAN/JEWISH 267 – Yiddish Song & the Jewish Experience

SCAND ST 101/404-001 – First Semester Norwegian (404 for graduate students only)

SCAND ST 102/404-002 – Second Semester Norwegian (404 for graduate students only)

SCAND ST/MEDIEVAL 430 – The Vikings

SLAVIC 101 and SLAVIC 102 – First Year Russian

SLAVIC 117 and SLAVIC 118 – Second Year Russian

SLAVIC/THEATRE/CURRIC 362 – Drama for Teaching & Learning

For the most up-to-date listings see the Course Guide.

Please email our Undergraduate Coordinator (sutten4@wisc.edu) if you have any questions about enrolling.

Information about Enrolling in Intensive Russian Language
For the summer 2018, the Slavic program will offer two sets of intensive Russian language classes for first year Russian and second year Russian. The accelerated program condenses one year of Russian study into an eight-week summer session. Students must enroll in the courses in pairs:

First Year Russian: SLAVIC 101 and SLAVIC 102
Second Year Russian: SLAVIC 117 and SLAVIC 118

UW-Madison students may enroll in these courses following normal procedures and do not need prior approval.

 

Course Descriptions

GERMAN 101/401 First Semester German / First Semester German for Graduate Students

9:00-10:50 AM M-F; June 18 – August 12, 2018

Presumes no knowledge of the German language. In the course students learn basic vocabulary around topics such as classroom objects, daily routines, descriptions of people and objects, simple narration in present time, etc. German 101 covers material presented in the textbook VORSPRUNG from Kapitel 1 to Kapitel 6. Students read and discuss “real” texts (written by and for native) speakers from the start. Grammar is explained using examples from these texts as well as from a graphic novel, told in installments, that traces the journey of an American exchange student, Anna Adler, to the university in Tübingen as well as her adventures once there. The course also offers basic cultural insights and comparisons that are further elaborated on in second-year courses.

 

GERMAN 267 Yiddish Song and the Jewish Experience

Online; June 18 – August 12, 2018

Explores Yiddish song as an expression of the modern Jewish experience from Eastern Europe to the US. Covers folk song, popular and art music. Music and readings together provide an analytical framework to examine cultural and historical issues

 

SCAND ST 101/404-001 First Semester Norwegian

(404 for graduate students only)

Online; June 18 – July 15, 2018

Norwegian 101 is a first semester language course that presumes no knowledge of the Norwegian language. It is open to freshman. The course develops basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing Norwegian. We offer a thematic, communicative approach to language teaching that strives to put language in the context of culture. Classroom time focuses on communication and listening, as well as introducing basic grammatical concepts. Homework centers on reinforcing vocabulary, reading, grammar exercises and writing. Thematic units covered in Norwegian 101 include social introductions, education, food, daily-life, leisure activities, weather and seasons.

 

SCAND ST 102/404-002 Second Semester Norwegian

(404 for graduate students only)

Online; July 16 – August 12, 2018

This course continues to build basic skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing Norwegian. We offer a thematic, communicative approach to language teaching that strives to put language in the context of culture. Class time focuses on communication and listening, as well as introducing basic grammatical concepts. Homework centers on reinforcing vocabulary, reading, grammar exercises and writing. Thematic units covered in Norwegian 102 include clothing, family and relationships, appearance and personality, celebrations, hometowns and housing, work and economy.

 

SCAND ST 430 The Vikings

Online; May 21 – June 16, 2018

This course approaches the Vikings along historical lines, and its backbone is texts from medieval sources. The legendary history of early Scandinavia, the consolidation of the Scandinavian kingdoms, developments both at home and abroad during the great period of Viking expansion, finally the conversion of Scandinavia to Christianity (which wrote finis to the Viking adventure) –these are the historical subjects discussed. Within this historical framework, a good deal of attention is devoted to the pre-Christian religion of early medieval Scandinavia, to its system of writing (the celebrated runes) and its literature (including the mythological and heroic poetry of the Edda, the court poems of the skalds, and the Icelandic sagas), to Viking art and archaeology. As we learn about the medieval Scandinavians we gain a greater understanding of ourselves and the human condition.

 

SLAVIC 101 and 102 Intensive First Year Russian

M-F; June 18 – August 12, 2018

Welcome to First Year Russian! In this course you will learn how to: read, write and pronounce the letters and sounds of the Russian alphabet; become acquainted with speakers of Russian in informal and formal settings; request and receive information; make simple statements, ask and answer yes/no questions; say goodbye; say where someone lives; exchange telephone numbers; ask to whom something belongs; link topics of conversation; express dismay and delight; express judgment and emotion, including strong feelings and opinions; express indirect questions; talk about sports, professions and music; express possession, location, and permission; give commands; talk about academic matters (university life and studies); express that you can or want to do something; talk about likes and dislikes, liking and loving someone or something; talk about past and future events; use some time expressions; recount what someone else has said; make inquiries and requests; express location; express going places; say when something happened; say that someone is glad or ready; express arrival or departure; describe prices and quantities; express possession; explain where someone is from; express needs and obligations; discuss theater, film, the weather, travel; make comparisons; express frequency; discuss learning and teaching; discuss what you want to be or become; single out a person or thing from a group; express absence; express need, permission, possibility, prohibition, shame, boredom and other states; describe people and things; talk about eating (always important!); make indirect requests; tell time; emphasize things; describe temporary states; ask for suggestions and advice; describe your interests; talk about summer plans; talk about dining out; AND MORE

 

SLAVIC 117 and 118 Intensive Second Year Russian

M-F; June 18 – August 12, 2018

Welcome to Intensive Second Year Russian! After completing this course, you will be able to: talk about yourself, your interests, and people you know; discuss university life, dining, theater, music and ballet; express opinions and preferences, convey surprise, regret, doubt and consolation; format letters and emails, find useful information on the Internet, use proper phone etiquette; make plans for travel and tourism; ask for, give and receive directions; recall important Russian cultural figures and read excerpts from famous works of literature; write and edit short written compositions on a variety of topics; deliver 3-5 minute presentations on topics of interest; and much more!

 

SLAVIC 362 Drama for Teaching and Learning

12:30-4:00 PM M-F; May 29 – June 17, 2018

Prerequisites: Open to first-year students

This is a methods course useful for all involved in teaching and learning, including foreign languages. Introduction to philosophy, methodology, and practice of the use of drama and performance techniques in any educational or recreational settings. Focus on creativity and embodied and contextual learning, based on current neurological, psychological, and sociological research. A practical class which includes demonstration and practice with children.

This course meets in the Eagle Heights Community Center on campus and works with the PreK class in the Eagle’s Wing Childcare Center. Free parking is available at the Community Center, and the 80 bus, which picks up throughout UW campus, takes students free of charge to the Community Center.

Students seeking to enroll in Directed Study courses for German, Scandinavian Studies, Slavic, or GNS must complete a Directed Study Form. Students should complete the form in conversation with the instructor with whom they plan to take the course. In most cases, students will not be authorized to enroll in a Directed Study courses until they have completed and submitted the form to our Undergraduate Coordinator.