German Courses Fall 2021

  • GERMAN 101 – First Semester German

    (4 credits)

    • Section 001: MTWRF 9:55-10:45 am
    • Section 002: MTWRF 11:00-11:50 am
    • Section 003: MTWRF 12:05-12:55 pm
    • Section 004: MTWRF 1:20-2:10 pm
    • Section 005: MWR 3:30-4:50 pm

    Course Description: GERMAN 101/401 is an introductory course designed for beginners in German who have no previous knowledge of the German language. It is the first of a four-course program (first- through fourth-semester German). By the end of the first semester, you should be able to express likes, dislikes, and interests in German in speaking and writing. This class will expose you to authentic texts from a variety of sources in different genres and modes, in order for you to develop your reading, viewing, and listening skills and engage in critical thinking. Grammar and vocabulary will be introduced in context. Assessments focus on all skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening). Throughout the semester, you will learn more about yourself and deepen your linguistic and culture knowledge of the German-speaking world. You will also improve your language-learning strategies. In order to be successful and achieve course learning outcomes, you will be expected to complete homework on time and participate in class. Attendance is required. This course cannot be audited. See the UW Bookstore for required materials. Contact the course supervisor, Dr. Jeanne Schueller (jmschuel@wisc.edu), with any questions about the course or appropriate placement.

    Prerequisites: None.

    (This course is also offered to graduate students for 3 credits as GERMAN 401.)

  • GERMAN 102 – Second Semester German

    (4 credits)

    • Section 001: MTWRF 12:05-12:55 pm
    • Section 002: MWR 3:30-4:50 pm

    Course Description: GERMAN 102/402 is a continuation of German 101. Students need to have completed German 101 or achieve an appropriate score on the placement exam to enroll. Students learn to narrate using past time markers, to express wishes and conditional ideas, to expand on their ability to describe, and to understand and produce extended texts on everyday topics. Students are exposed to authentic texts from the start. Grammar is explained using examples from these texts. The course also offers basic cultural insights and comparisons that are further elaborated on in second-year courses. Testing is done in increments of chapter quizzes; there is no mid-term and no traditional final exam. Students also complete writing and reading assessments, as well as oral projects. Class participation is expected, and attendance is required. This course cannot be audited. See the UW Bookstore for required materials. Contact the course supervisor, Dr. Jeanne Schueller (jmschuel@wisc.edu), with any questions about the course or appropriate placement.

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 101 or appropriate score on the placement exam. Open to first-year students.

    (This course is also offered to graduate students for 3 credits as GERMAN 402.)

  • GERMAN 111 – First Semester Dutch

    (4 credits)

    • MTWR 9:55-10:45 am

    Course Description: One of the advantages of studying at the UW is being able to take courses in Dutch. Although the study of Dutch linguistics and literature has steadily expanded at major American universities in recent years, many universities do not offer this language. Since Dutch is a Germanic language—linguistically related to both German and English—and since the Dutch have always had close ties, Dutch is a logical choice as an additional language for American students from a range of majors or areas of interest.

    Prerequisites: None

    (This course is also offered to graduate students for 3 credits as GERMAN 311.)

  • GERMAN 203 – Third Semester German

    (4 credits)

    • Section 001: MTWR 9:55-10:45 am
    • Section 002: MTWR 11:00-11:50 am
    • Section 003: MTWR 12:05-12:55 pm
    • Section 004: MW 3:30-5:10 pm

    Course Description: GERMAN 203/403 reviews German grammar but prior knowledge of these concepts is assumed. Students need to have completed German 102 or achieve an appropriate score on the placement exam to enroll. The primary objective of the course is to give students the opportunity to explore language as it is embedded in the culture. Students will explore mostly contemporary but also historical aspects of the cultures of the German-speaking world through a journey through major cities and regions of Austria, Germany, or Switzerland. Testing is done in increments, with chapter quizzes instead of mid-terms or a traditional final exam. Students complete writing and reading assessments, as well as oral projects. During the second half of the semester students will have the opportunity to sign up for a mini seminar of their choice. These weeklong seminars substitute for regular class meetings and permit students to explore specific interests in German language, linguistics, literature, and culture/history. Class participation is expected, and attendance is required. This course cannot be audited. See the UW Bookstore for required materials. Contact the course supervisor, Dr. Jeanne Schueller (jmschuel@wisc.edu), with any questions about the course or appropriate placement.

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 102 or appropriate score on the placement exam. Open to First-Year Students.

    (This course is also offered to graduate students for 3 credits as GERMAN 403.)

  • GERMAN 204 – Fourth Semester German

    (4 credits)

    • Section 001: MTWR 11:00-11:50 am
    • Section 002: MW 3:30-5:10 pm

    Course Description: GERMAN 204/404 is a continuation of German 203. Students need to have completed German 203 or achieve an appropriate score on the placement exam to enroll. This course reviews German grammar but prior knowledge of these concepts is assumed. The primary objective of the course is to give students the opportunity to explore language as it is embedded in the culture. Students will explore mostly contemporary but also historical aspects of the cultures of the German-speaking world through a journey through major cities and regions of Austria, Germany, or Switzerland. Testing is done in increments, with chapter quizzes instead of mid-terms or a traditional final exam. Students complete writing and reading assessments, as well as two oral projects (not traditional exams). During the second half of the semester students will have the opportunity to sign up for a mini seminar of their choice. These weeklong seminars substitute for regular class meetings and permit students to explore specific interests in German language, linguistics, literature, and culture/history. Class participation is expected, and attendance is required. This course cannot be audited. See the UW Bookstore for required materials. Contact the course supervisor, Dr. Jeanne Schueller (jmschuel@wisc.edu), with any questions about the course or appropriate placement.

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 203 or appropriate score on placement exam. Open to First-Year Students.

    (This course is also offered to graduate students for 3 credits as GERMAN 404.)

  • GERMAN 213 – Third Semester Dutch

    (4 credits)

    • MTWR 12:05-12:55 pm

    Course Description: One of the advantages of studying at the UW is being able to take courses in Dutch. Although the study of Dutch linguistics and literature has steadily expanded at major American universities in recent years, many universities do not offer this language. Since Dutch is a Germanic language—linguistically related to both German and English—and since the Dutch have always had close ties, Dutch is a logical choice as an additional language for American students from a range of majors or areas of interest.

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 112 or appropriate score on placement exam. Open to First-Year Students.

    (This course is also offered for graduate students as GERMAN 313.)

  • GERMAN 249 – Intermediate German: Speaking and Listening

    (3 credits)

    • Section 001: MWF 8:50-9:40 am         
    • Section 002: MWF 11:00-11:50 am           Instructor: Julie Larson-Guenette
    • Section 003: MWF 1:20-2:10 pm               Instructor: Julie Larson-Guenette

    Course Description: Drawing mainly on contemporary audio and video materials from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, students will explore linguistic and cultural variation of German by learning how native speakers vary their use of sound structures, vocabulary, and grammar according to speech situation.

    Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course, the aim is for students to:

    • improve their comprehension and production of spoken German via exposure to the language in use in audio and video formats and through use of the International Phonetic Alphabet;
    • develop communication strategies to increase oral fluency;
    • promote their awareness of how spoken German varies according to speech situation and region mainly in terms of sound structures, vocabulary, and pragmatics of speech;
    • enhance their understanding of contemporary German-speaking cultures in Europe and the central role that language plays in shaping these cultures.

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 204 or appropriate score on placement exam or consent of the course supervisor. This course can be taken subsequent to, prior to, or concurrent with GERMAN 262, GERMAN 258, and GERMAN 285. Open to first-year students.

  • GERMAN 258 – Intermediate German: Reading

    (3 credits)

    • Section 001: MWF 9:55-10:45 am             Instructor: Jeanne Schueller
    • Section 002: MWF 11:00-11:50 am

    Course Description: This course is designed to acquaint students with German literary, cultural, and historical texts and provide an overview of cultural developments in German-speaking countries. An important goal of this course is to offer explicit instruction on reading strategies to help students improve their comprehension of a range of texts. In German 258, students will recognize different genres (text types) and identify applicable reading strategies; implement critical reading skills for reading and comprehending different genres and written registers; identify, define, and implement vocabulary related to the topics covered in class; situate a text within its cultural and historical contexts in the German-speaking world; demonstrate the ability to read autonomously; and select and interpret a text based on individual academic interests. Two books and a course pack are required and can be purchased at the University Bookstore. All other materials will be available on Canvas.

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 204 or consent of instructor. This course can be taken subsequent to, prior to, or concurrent with GERMAN 249 and GERMAN 262. Open to First-year Students.

  • GERMAN 262 – Intermediate German: Writing

    (3 credits)

    • Section 001: TR 9:30-10:45 am                   Instructor: Melissa Sheedy
    • Section 002: TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm          Instructor: Melissa Sheedy
    • Section 003: TR 1:00-2:15 pm

    Course Description: Fairytales, murder mysteries, screenplays, and … resumes? Welcome to Intermediate German Writing! In this class, students will expand and enhance their writing skills in German by exploring a variety of different text types and genres. Daily course participation will involve active in-class discussion as well as collaborative and individual writing activities. Learners will work with authentic texts, music, and film, and they will also engage with synonyms, regional variations, and register to develop the skills to express themselves effectively and creatively in German. Through the composition of a variety of text types, from the practical to the fanciful, course participants will expand their individual comfort zone and could improve their own communication skills as well as comprehension of written texts. Materials and in-class discussions will be in German.

    Learning outcomes:

    • Recognize different genres, reading styles, and strategies.
    • Implement critical reading skills for reading and comprehending different types of texts.
    • Identify, define, and implement vocabulary related to the topics covered in class.

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 204 or appropriate score on placement exam or consent of instructor. This course can be taken subsequent to, prior to, or concurrent with GERMAN 249 and GERMAN 258.

  • GERMAN 267 – Yiddish Song and the Jewish Experience

    (3-4 credits)

    • Lecture 001 (LEC only): M 1:20-2:10 pm          Instructor: Pamela Potter
    • Lecture 002: M 1:20-2:10 pm                                Instructor: Pamela Potter
      • DIS 301: W 1:20-2:10 pm
      • DIS 302: F 1:20-2:10 pm

    Course Description: Using the medium of Yiddish song to explore the culture and history of Jews in the diaspora, we will focus on Jews’ experiences as a minority first in Europe and then in the United States. Facing discrimination, oppression, and marginalization on both sides of the Atlantic, Jews used Yiddish song as a vehicle to express their pain as well as their pride. The goals of this course are to increase students’ capacity to value the unique qualities of Yiddish song as a reflection of the Jewish experience by appreciating the depth of expression conveyed in its sounds and its lyrics, as well as to gain insight into the process of immigration and acculturation in the United States from the perspective of a persecuted group, the challenges it faced in confrontation with new forms of discrimination and marginalization, and the outlet this group found in the performing arts for documenting their struggles and for finding a creative niche in their new surroundings. We will also use the experience of this community to explore the present-day issues of xenophobia, racism, and anti-immigration movements. The format of this course is hybrid: students will work through on-line modules and discussion forums on their own and meet once a week for in-class activities in the multifunctional WisCEL classroom. Those who choose to take the course for optional Comm-B credit will attend an additional section once a week and receive an additional credit.

    Prerequisites: For Communication B sections, must have satisfied Communication A requirement.

  • GERMAN 276 – From Grimm to Gryffindor: German Fairytales (Re)imagined

    (3 credits)

    • TR 1:00-2:15 pm          Instructor: Melissa Sheedy

    Course Description: From wolves to witches, Rumpelstiltskin to Rapunzel, the German fairy-tale tradition is filled with rich imagery, familiar themes, and political and social subversion. Of enduring popularity and as constant subjects of reimagination and revitalization, German tales and their manifold retellings serve as a unique lens through which to view the social, political, and cultural contexts in which they were produced. Through the texts emphasized in this course, we will glimpse the underlying perceptions and values regarding family, gender, nation, nature, religion, and society both in the first half of the nineteenth century and in the Germany of the last 25 years. With an eye to depictions of gender and gender roles as well as to conceptions of the environment and civilization, we will critically engage with these works and contextualize them within the social and political landscapes that shaped them. Our investigations will center on fairytales and their recent retellings in a variety of forms, including familiar and unfamiliar tales by the Grimm Brothers, and with a special focus on fairytales by women writers. All readings, materials, and discussions will be in English.

    Learning outcomes:

    • Critically engage with German fairytales from different time periods and contextualize them within the social and political landscapes that shaped them.
    • Explore fairytales through a variety of analytical lenses, including feminist and queer theories, ecocriticism, and psychoanalytic perspectives.
    • Recognize and analyze the fairytale’s transcultural influences in literature, art, music, poetry, and pop culture.

    Prerequisites: None.

  • GERMAN 278 – Berlin Culture

    (3 credits)

    • MW 2:30-3:45 pm          Instructor: Pamela Potter

    Course Description: In the twentieth century, Berlin has functioned as the seat of government and as a showcase for conflicting ideologies during the Cold War, and it now faces the challenge of returning to its function as reunified Germany’s capital without ignoring its past. Through it all, Berlin has maintained a reputation as a center for artistic experimentation and a mecca for alternative culture. This course will examine the various arts and forms of entertainment from the turn of the century through the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the Cold War, and the reunification, in an effort to determine how politics, economics, and demographics have come together to shape a unique Berlin culture. The format of this course will be hybrid, with a combination of lectures and flipped classroom formats (on-line work followed up with in-class active-learning projects). Most weeks the class will meet once in-person, but some weeks it will be necessary to meet in-person twice (for student presentations, guest lectures, etc.).

    Prerequisites: None.

  • GERMAN 278 – Barbarian Life & Culture

    (3 credits)

    • TR 4:00-5:15 pm          Instructor: Katerina Somers

    Course Description: This course is about barbarians real and imagined. We will begin by learning about the Germanic barbarians of Late Antiquity: a linguistically diverse, geographically scattered constellation of tribes with no sense whatsoever of a common identity. But contemporary Roman authors, such as Tacitus and Julius Caesar, already imagined the barbarians, with whom their empire had extensive contact, as something different: an uncivilized, undifferentiated and racially uniform Other, collectively referred to as the Germani ‘the Germans.’ We will analyze how subsequent generations of German speakers appropriated and rehabilitated the barbarian, transforming the primitive horde into the courageous and noble forefathers of a great German nation. The nineteenth and early twentieth centuries see the barbarian reimagined yet again and turned into a racial phenotype, which those interested in asserting their supremacy over other peoples used as a model for the “best” or even “purest” type of European. Finally, we will discuss how this deadly ideal influences the formation of national identity in Germany and the United States. This course is taught in English and has no prerequisites.

    Prerequisites: None.

  • GERMAN 278 – German World In Imaginations

    (3 credits)

    • TR 4:00-5:15 pm          Instructor: Nâlân Erbil

    Course Description: This course is not about and is all about the German World. Movies, shows, food, literature, songs, (fake) news…will tell us how the contemporary German World is (re)imagined elsewhere. This elsewhere constitutes its peripheral perspectives both from within and outside. Comparing myths, stereotypes, Occidentalist tropes from the outside with narratives about and by its diverse population in popular culture and beyond from the late 1960s until the present will inform our rethinking of today’s German speaking societies. (All materials and discussions will be in English and there is no prerequisite).

    Prerequisites: None.

  • GERMAN 325 – Anne Frank

    (3 credits)

    • T 2:30-3:45 pm and ONLINE R 2:30-3:45 pm          Instructor: Jolanda Vanderwal Taylor
      • DIS 301: W 1:20-2:10 pm

    Course Description: Anne Frank counts as one of the most widely read writers in recent world history, and yet some wonder whether she should be called a writer. Her work is widely loved. It has been the inspiration for many other cultural artifacts and institutions: editions; biographies; works of fiction and non-fiction; plays; autobiographies (e.g. by friends of Anne Frank); scholarly research: literary-, cultural-, historical-, as well as research in the various sciences of manuscript authentication; exhibitions; museums; foundations. In this course we will study the context in which the Diaries were written and consider the various ways in which they were received. We will look at what was done with the Diaries and with Anne Frank: how they have been read, interpreted, used, and argued about. We will engage in critical thinking, asking not just: what? but also: why? We will consider what her work and life have to say to us as we face the legacy and continued scourge of racism. We will certainly consider some of her laments as we consider out own, somewhat confined, existence. We will take Anne seriously as a writer by reading her works (the Diaries and other short texts) attentively. And then we will also think about the nature of literature: is what Ms. Frank wrote literature? Why, or why not?

    Prerequisites: Four semester of Dutch or consent of instructor.

  • GERMAN 337 – Advanced Composition and Conversation

    (3 credits)

    • MWF 9:55-10:45 am          Instructor: Julie Larson-Guenette

    Course Description: GERMAN 337 will summarize, synthesize, and advance the content and skills from previous German coursework with specific aims to enhance and improve speaking, listening, reading, and writing of German. Course content will cover a range of topics related to contemporary German-speaking society and culture along with grammar review.

    In GERMAN 337 students will:

    • Implement strategies for enhanced listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.
    • Identify and develop elements of grammar needed to improve accuracy in speaking and writing.
    • Differentiate and apply vocabulary for discussion of topics spanning across genres and registers.
    • Examine and analyze cultural perspectives and products of the German-speaking areas.

    Prerequisites: (GERMAN 249, 258, and 262) or (GERMAN 249 and 274) or (GERMAN 249 and 284) or (GERMAN 249 and 285)

  • GERMAN 351 – Intro to German Linguistics

    (3 credits)

    • MWF 1:20-2:10 pm          Instructor: Mark Louden

    Course Description: In GERMAN 351 you will learn to analyze how sounds, words, and sentences are formed in German and how these structures vary regionally. The focus in the first half of the course will be mainly on the sounds of German: how they are produced and how we transcribe them. We then consider how these sounds have changed over the history of German as reflected in both the standard language and modern dialects. This half of the course will wrap up with a discussion of where German personal, family, and place names come from.

    In the second half of the course we will look at a number of productive processes involved with forming German words. Many of the examples we will consider are words that have entered the language in the last twenty years. We will then look at how words are combined to form phrases and sentences in German. The course will conclude by examining topics broadly dealing with contact between the German and English languages, including youth speech, what is popularly known as “Denglisch” (English-influenced German), and German varieties spoken in the United States.

    Prerequisites: (GERMAN 249, 258, and 262) or (GERMAN 249 and 274) or (GERMAN 249 and 284) or (GERMAN 249 and 285)

  • GERMAN 362/GERMAN 385 – Science Fiction

    (3 credits)

    • TR 2:30-3:45 pm          Instructor: Sabine Mödersheim

    Course Description: In diesem Kurs werden wir deutschsprachige Sciene-Fiction-Literatur vom frühen 20. Jahrhundert bis zur Gegenwart lesen. Wer liest SF? Wer schreibt SF? Was sagen die Erfindungen und Fantasien über die Gesellschaft? Wie wollen wir in der Zukunft leben? Science-Fiction gilt zwar weithin als männliches Genre, doch haben Frauen nicht nur bei der Erfindung des Genres eine wichtige Rolle gespielt, sondern es auch nachhaltig geprägt. Wir werden Texte von Thea von Harbou, Hans Dominik, Kurd Laßwitz, Gudrun Pausewang, Myra Çakan u.a. lesen. Themen: Kalter Krieg der Sterne, Black to the Future, Amazonen im Weltraum, Steampunk, Ökopunk, Zukunftsromane.

    Prerequisites: (GERMAN 249, 258, and 262) or (GERMAN 249 and 274) or (GERMAN 249 and 284) or (GERMAN 249 and 285). GERMAN 385 for Honors students.

  • GERMAN 372 – Deutscher Film/Deutsche Kultur

    (3 credits)

    • MWF 12:05-12:55 pm and ONLINE F 9:55-10:45 am          Instructor: Jeanne Schueller

    Course Description: This course is designed to broaden your knowledge of German culture through the analysis and interpretation of film. We will consider the historical and cultural contexts of each film and read thematically related fiction and non-fiction texts. The course will introduce you to several critically acclaimed German films that explore a range of topics and genres. I will provide you with materials to help you better understand the films, but I am most interested in your reactions to them – what you enjoy, how they make you feel, what you discover about the German-speaking world, and what you learn about yourself through the process and the semester. Film-specific terminology and aspects of film analysis will be introduced at the beginning of the semester to facilitate our discussion of the films. The films and readings will be in German. Some films have German or English subtitles, and others are in German with no subtitles. Assessments will include regular assignments on Canvas; three writing assignments; an in-class presentation of a film review; and active participation. Partner, small-group, and whole-class discussions will be in German. Class materials will be available for download from Canvas. Feature-length films will be viewed outside of class; some short films will be viewed together in class.

    Prerequisites: (GERMAN 249, 258, and 262) or (GERMAN 249 and 274) or (GERMAN 249 and 284) or (GERMAN 249 and 285)

  • GERMAN 391– German for Graduate Reading Knowledge I

    (3 credits)

    • TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm            Instructor: Salvatore Calomino

    Course Description: This course is intended for those who wish to develop primarily reading skills in German. A thorough presentation of German grammar will be coupled, from the start, with regular practice in reading and translation. Various levels of academic prose will be covered with a twofold goal: participants will develop skills at comprehension in reading expository German in general; individuals will have the opportunity to begin reading German in their own research areas as well. No previous knowledge of German required. Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Taught in English.

    Prerequisites: Senior or graduate student status.

  • GERMAN 411– Kultur Des 20. Und 21. Jahrhunderts

    (3 credits)

    • TR 2:30-3:45 pm            Instructor: Sonja Klocke

    Course Description: Is there something specific about the “German experience” of the 20th and 21st centuries? And if so, how do cultural productions (literature; film; art; music) reflect these specificities as well as the political and historical realities such as Germany’s colonial past, two world wars, the division of Germany, its unification, globalization, and migration? These and other questions will be central to the course German 411, which aims to offer a deeper understanding of the German-speaking world in the 20th and early 21st centuries. We will consult a great variety of authors, watch and discuss several films, listen to music, and consider art. Texts we will read include literary and historical texts, central texts from German sociologists, and art history. Since in 20th and 21st century German culture, both normative and deviant concepts of gender, sex, and race have played an increasingly significant role in identity politics, all texts will be discussed within the theoretical frameworks of gender politics, nationalism, exile and migration, identity, and notions of the self and other.

    Prerequisites: (GERMAN 249, 258, and 262) or (GERMAN 249 and 274) or (GERMAN 249 and 284) or (GERMAN 249 and 285)

  • GERMAN 612 – German Literary Movements Since 1750

    (3 credits)

    • TR 11:00 am-12:15 pm            Instructor: Hannah Vandegrift Eldridge

    Course Description: Ideas and theories of literary movements exemplified in selected primary and secondary literature. This reading-intensive M.A. seminar exposes students to major authors, epochs, movements, and trends in German-language literature from ca. 1750 to the present. It presents novels, short stories, dramas, poems, films, and other text types in their historical contexts and addresses questions of literary historiography and canon formation.

    Prerequisites: Graduate student or two of the following course: GERMAN 302, 303, 305, 375/385

  • GERMAN 625 – Anne Frank

    (3 credits)

    • T 2:30-3:45 pm and ONLINE R 2:30-3:45 pm          Instructor: Jolanda Vanderwal Taylor
      • DIS 301: W 1:20-2:10 pm

    Course Description: Anne Frank counts as one of the most widely read writers in recent world history, and yet some wonder whether she should be called a writer. Her work is widely loved. It has been the inspiration for many other cultural artifacts and institutions: editions; biographies; works of fiction and non-fiction; plays; autobiographies (e.g. by friends of Anne Frank); scholarly research: literary-, cultural-, historical-, as well as research in the various sciences of manuscript authentication; exhibitions; museums; foundations. In this course we will study the context in which the Diaries were written and consider the various ways in which they were received. We will look at what was done with the Diaries and with Anne Frank: how they have been read, interpreted, used, and argued about. We will engage in critical thinking, asking not just: what? but also: why? We will consider what her work and life have to say to us as we face the legacy and continued scourge of racism. We will certainly consider some of her laments as we consider out own, somewhat confined, existence. We will take Anne seriously as a writer by reading her works (the Diaries and other short texts) attentively. And then we will also think about the nature of literature: is what Ms. Frank wrote literature? Why, or why not?

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 314 or consent of instructor.

  • GERMAN 650 – History-German Language

    (3 credits)

    • TR 2:30-3:45 pm            Instructor: Katerina Somers

    Course Description: This course will introduce you to the field of historical Germanic linguistics. It examines the Indo-European origin and subsequent development of the German language in changing cultural and social settings. We examine the origin of standard varieties of German at different periods as well as their relationship to non-standard or regional varieties. You will also become familiar with the various areas of scholarly activities in the field, their basic research methods and bibliographical resources. This course will deepen your understanding of how Modern German works by learning about its history. In addition to informing your own study of the language and its structure, what we learn in this course will make you a more effective teacher of German in that you will be better equipped to field difficult questions that can arise in the German language classroom.

    Prerequisites: Senior status or consent of instructor.

  • GERMAN 676 – Protestbewegungen

    (3 credits)

    • TR 4:00-5:15 pm            Instructor: Sabine Mödersheim

    Course Description: Für Veränderung kämpfen: Protestbewegungen in Deutschland In diesem Seminar besprechen wir Protestbewegungen in Deutschland seit 1945, von der Friedensbewegung und 1968er Studentenbewegung über die Anti-Atomkraft-Bewegung und die Montagsdemonstrationen bis hin zu den Fridays for Future-Demonstrationen und Anti-Rassismus-Demonstrationen heute. Was treibt die Protestierenden an? Wer ist aktiv? Wie organisieren sie sich? Welche Veränderungen haben sie erreicht? Wie haben sie die politische Landschaft und das Demokratieverständnis geprägt?

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 337 & 2 additional advanced German courses or consent of instructor.

  • GERMAN 683 – Protestbewegungen (Honors)

    (3 credits)

    • TR 4:00-5:15 pm            Instructor: Sabine Mödersheim

    Course Description: Für Veränderung kämpfen: Protestbewegungen in Deutschland In diesem Seminar besprechen wir Protestbewegungen in Deutschland seit 1945, von der Friedensbewegung und 1968er Studentenbewegung über die Anti-Atomkraft-Bewegung und die Montagsdemonstrationen bis hin zu den Fridays for Future-Demonstrationen und Anti-Rassismus-Demonstrationen heute. Was treibt die Protestierenden an? Wer ist aktiv? Wie organisieren sie sich? Welche Veränderungen haben sie erreicht? Wie haben sie die politische Landschaft und das Demokratieverständnis geprägt? Honors-Projekt zur Bundestagswahl im September 2021: Erforschung der politischen Parteien und des politischen Einflusses von Protestbewegungen auf die Gründung von Parteien und deren Programme. Texte und Materialien werden auf Canvas bereitgestellt.

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 337 & 2 additional advanced German courses or consent of instructor.

  • GERMAN 755 – Early New High German

    (3 credits)

    • TR  1:00-2:15 pm            Instructor: Salvatore Calomino

    Prerequisites: GERMAN 651 or consent of instructor.

  • GERMAN 804 – Interdisciplinary Western European Area Studies Seminar

    (3 credits)

    • T 4:00-6:30 pm            Instructor: Sunny Yudkoff

    Course Description: What is an archive? What does it mean to “do” archival research? This interdisciplinary seminar approaches these questions by examining the archive both as a site of scholarly practice and as a theoretical mode of collecting, classifying, and disseminating information. We will consider a wide range of archival sites (museums, personal libraries, state institutions, etc.), investigating how these spaces produce knowledge, curate memories, elicit affective responses, and establish national narratives. We will also examine questions of visibility, accessibility, and digitization, and think about how different voices are marginalized or excluded from the archive. Students will pursue final papers using archival sources germane to their subjects. Readings may include work by Carolyn Steedman, Michel Foucault, Saidiya Hartman, Joan Scott, S.D. Goitein, Jacque Derrida, and S.Y. Agnon.

    Prerequisites: Graduate student or professional standing.